Construction Industry Predictions for 2016

Construction Industry Predictions for 2016

06th January 2016

We’ve come to the end of another year and we’ve now started a bright New Year so we want to take this opportunity to wish a Happy New Year to all of our readers and customers and hope that 2016 brings you all that you’re hoping for.  We’re also going to take a look at what the future is likely to hold for the construction industry here in the UK in 2016 so we’ve been on the lookout for 2016 predictions from industry leaders and shakers.  We can have a fair idea of what will be happening in the world – we know that the American election process is well under way and that a new president will be elected in November ready to be sworn in the following January.  Before that, in May of 2016 we’ll be voting for a new Mayor of London on the same day as the London Assembly election takes place.  Here in the UK we’ll be holding a referendum on whether or not to remain in the European Union and the outcome of that referendum is likely to affect all of the industries in Britain.

  • Apparently we’re likely to see a decline in unemployment in the construction industry in the coming year as a result of a steadily improving economy which has led to new building projects and inward investment.  Industry leaders have been warning for some time now of a skills shortage here in the UK so it will be interesting to see the effect of that and whether the extension of the apprenticeship programme will help to offset the shortfall. 
  • Despite a couple of recent downward trends, we’re likely to see growth in the construction sector in the coming year, mainly due to a growing demand for housing, coupled with low oil prices. 
  • The construction industry, along with the manufacturing industry is working on ways in which to strengthen security and it’s estimated that billions of pounds are lost to vandalism and theft each year.  As more construction sites incorporate increasingly sophisticated technology into their businesses, security is likely to improve on construction sites across the UK.
  • BIM (Building Information Modelling) is set to change the construction sector by encouraging collaboration through the entire lifecycle of a project.  There are more resources available to those who work in the sector and the Construction Industry Council (CIC) here in the UK has created regional BIM Hubs to raise awareness about the benefits of BIM to the industry as a whole.
  • Greater sustainability is also on the cards for 2016 as we try to tackle climate change and environmental problems with a more sustainable approach to housebuilding and other construction activities.  This can only lead to an improvement in the way in which we live, work and play and there’s a continuing demand for greener products and a greener lifestyle.  As we say goodbye to boom and bust economics, stricter mortgage lending criteria based on affordability will help to ensure that people can only buy houses they can afford – this will obviously lead to demand for more affordable housing which will be positive for the construction industry in the long run.